By Drew Johnson
Wednesday, Sep 30th, 2009 @ 1:50 pm
Our spy photographers have just snapped pictures of a pack of "Coyote"ť-powered F-150 pickups out running with Ford's new 4-valve 5.0-liter V-8 engine, including the first photo you see here of the Coyote in an F-150 engine bay.

In January, we first told you about Ford's plans to phase out the current 4.6-liter and 5.4-liter eight cylinder engines and replace them with the Coyote V-8 in 2010. The engine will be shared with the Mustang and is expected to produce approximately 400 horsepower and 400 pounds-feet of torque. We also showed you the first pictures of the new Coyote V-8 cradled under the open hood of a Mustang test car. Interestingly, the Mustang engine we spied earlier appeared to have an aluminum intake manifold while the 5.0-liter V-8 in the F-150 appears to have a composite intake manifold.

Ford is testing the engine in every trim level of F-150, plus one very interesting test truck with 7-lug wheels - an indication the 5.0-liter V-8 might power a heavy duty payload package version of the half-ton.

Unlike the 3.5-liter EcoBoost V-6 that's scheduled to arrive in late 2010 for the F-150, the 5.0-liter Coyote V-8 won't use direct injection or turbocharging. It's a naturally aspirated motor with fuel economy that's expected to be comparable to the current 5.4-liter V-8. It's also expected to use a cast aluminum engine block instead of iron, to help save weight.

Interestingly, the 5.0-liter V-8 is said to produce power levels that are in the same neighborhood as the larger 6.2-liter V-8 that arrives in the Ford F-150 SVT Raptor in February, and the 3.5-liter V-6 EcoBoost engine.

Of course, our sources tell us that Ford is already working on a version of the Coyote V-8 that will separate itself from the rest of the future V-8 engine lineup. In cartoons, the Coyote is only beat by a Road Runner. Look for a twin-turbo 5.0-liter "Road Runner"ť V-8 to debut first in the Mustang GT500 by 2013 and possibly, in F-150 Harley-Davidson edition pickups.

September 30th, 2009

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