2015 Ford Edge

The Edge is a mid-size, five-passenger crossover positioned between Ford's compact Escape and full-size Explorer models. It's perhaps most notable for its extensive range of available features; buyers can choose from a number of high-tech options, such as advanced lane keeping and park assist features.

The Edge is all-new, riding on a redesigned platform featuring an all-new suspension, two turbocharged EcoBoost engines and, for the first time, available all-wheel-drive on four-cylinder models.

Like the Fusion on which it is based, it offers a McPherson Strut suspension up front and an integral-link independent setup in the rear.

With the redesign, Ford elected to rethink its powertrain options. Under the hood, the engine offerings have been overhauled for more fuel efficiency and power. This time around, two EcoBoost engines are available--a 2.0L four-cylinder pushing 245hp and 275lb-ft of torque and a 2.7L V6 making 315hp and 350 lb-ft.

The four-cylinder EcoBoost is available on SE, SEL and Titanium trims, either in front- or all-wheel-drive configurations (a first for the Edge). It's good for 20 mpg city, 30 on the highway and 24 combined with front-wheel drive and 24/28/23 with all-wheel drive. The 2.7L six is exclusive to the Sport, and gets 18 mpg city, 27 mpg highway and 21 mpg combined as a front-driver and 17/24/20 if all four wheels are driven.

Buyers who want the simplicity of a naturally aspirated engine can still opt for the 3.5L Duratec V6, now making 280hp and 250lb-ft of torque, in the SE, SEL and Titanium trims with either AWD or FWD. In FWD trim, it'll return 18 mpg city, 26 mpg highway and 21 combined. All-wheel drive drops that to 17/25/20.

All three engines are mated to a six-speed automatic transmission with SelectShift and standard paddle shifters.

Inside and Out
The new Edge is leaner, more sculpted and more muscular than the car it replaces. Gone are the slab sides and upright posture. The old upright stance is further muted by more aggressively raked front and rear glass. On the flanks, sharp parallel creases run from the front fender to the tail lamp and along the bottom of the doors. Sport models are adorned with black aero skirts on the sides beneath body-colored rocker panels, and the theme continues in the front with a Mustang-inspired front splitter. More pony-car styling cues can found on the hood in the form of bulging creases running up each side.

The grille (blacked out on the Sport; chrome on other trims) integrates with the headlamps as it did on the 2014, but it's divided in two by a body-colored horizontal strip. The top half takes on Ford's new hexagonal corporate look, and the overall effect of the split grille shrinks the visual mass of the front end. The new Edge looks hunkered-down and aggressive.

In the rear, the lamps form a single stripe across the body, just below the "faster" (designer-speak for "less-upright") rear glass. The 2014's oval exhaust tips are gone in favor of integrated finishers (flanking a faux diffuser on Sport models). As with the rest of the vehicle, the new look here has the effect of reducing the Edge's visual mass and giving it a sporty, contemporary presence.

Highlights of the interior include comfortable, slim-framed front seats, which can be had heated or ventilated (a heated rear bench is also available, as is a steering wheel); fast-charge USB ports; and a 120v AC outlet for the rear seat.

A raft of NVH-reducing measures and upgraded materials were introduced with the new model. Acoustic glass is now available in the windshield and in some side windows, and the underbody is fitted with sound-deadening panels (which also reduce aerodynamic drag).

Features and Options
The Edge can be spec'd with MyFord Touch, an infotainment system that builds on SYNC by letting users control everything from navigation to climate control to the sound system with voice commands. MyFord Touch also replaces conventional sound system knobs and buttons with a center-mounted eight-inch touchscreen, dual 4.2-inch displays in the instrument cluster and touch-sensitive controls in the center stack. Many consumers report that the system is a "love it or hate it" item, so those interested in the Edge are advised to try before they buy.

Cross-path monitoring, blind spot monitoring, adaptive cruise control, lane departure warning and lane keeping are all available, but the Edge's true "killer app" is its new advanced park assist. Not only will your Edge help you enter and exit a parallel parking space, but it will now help you park conventionally as well.

While Sync 3 was originally expected to debut with the new Edge, Ford announced recently that it will be a late-availability feature.

Trim Level Breakdown
The Edge is available in four trims: SE, SEL, Titanium (replacing Limited) and Sport. All trims are available in either front- or all-wheel drive. SE, SEL and Titanium models can be optioned with either the four cylinder EcoBoost or the 3.5L, naturally aspirated V6.

The Sport model is available exclusively with the twin-turbocharged 2.7L EcoBoost engine and has unique suspension and chassis tuning to maximize performance.

Occupant Safety
Helping to keep families safe in the Edge are dual front, side and full-length side curtain airbags in addition to traction and stability control systems and a tire pressure monitoring system.

Key Competitors
As a mid-size, two-row crossover, the Edge faces competition from smaller five passenger 'utes like the Honda CR-V and Nissan Rogue while, at the other end of the spectrum, it is also cross-shopped against slightly larger vehicles like the Dodge Journey and Toyota Venza that seat seven. The Nissan Murano, Hyundai Santa Fe Sport and Kia Sorento are perhaps the Edge's closest rivals in size and mission, however.