The 90-second video highlights key models and dates in the Range Rover's history.

Land Rover has condensed 48 years of Range Rover history into a minute and a half-long video.

The first 26 Range Rover prototypes were assembled in 1969. Spy photographers were few and far between at the time, so the off-roaders were tested all over Europe without camouflage. However, the "Range Rover" script on the hood was replaced by "Velar" in order to mask the 4x4's true identity. Velar is a made-up word that sounds like the Italian word velare, which means "to veil."

Range Rover production started in 1970. The SUV remained relatively unchanged until 1981, when a four-door model joined the lineup. The four-door Range shared its overall dimensions with the two-door model; only the front doors were shortened.

The Range was exclusively sold in Europe for the first 17 years of its life. A few examples trickled into the United States through gray market channels, but official sales didn't start until 1987. The two-door model was never exported to our shores due to a perceived lack of demand from buyers.

The Range Rover became the first 4x4 fitted with ABS brakes in 1989. 1992 brought electronic traction control and automatic air suspension.

The original Range Rover was finally replaced in 1994 with a brand-new, second-generation model named P38. Designers opted not to make drastic changes to the design. The P38-series was more modern-looking than its predecessor, but it was unmistakably a Range Rover.

The third-generation Range Rover that debuted in 2001 shifted to unibody construction, a highly controversial decision at the time. The styling was again more evolutionary than revolutionary -- by that point, the Range Rover had become an icon all over the world.

Finally, the current Range Rover was introduced 2014. It retained the third-gen model's monocoque construction, but it was built entirely out of aluminum in order to shed as much weight as possible.