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There's little the British company can do to protect its intellectual property in the world's biggest car market.

Land Rover is still trying to stop Land Wind from selling a clone of the Range Rover Evoque named X7. However, there's little the British company can do to protect its intellectual property in the world's biggest car market.Land Wind made headlines when it introduced the X7 (pictured) back in 2014. It's all but identical to the Evoque; it even wears fake Land Rover emblems on both ends. Three years later, Land Rover isn't any closer to convincing the Chinese authorities to issue a stop-sale order. Taking the battle to court to make the X7 illegal has been futile, too.

Adding insult to injury is the fact that the Land Wind X7 is a surprisingly popular model in China. It appeals to buyers because it offers Evoque-like style for a third of the cost of the real thing. It's not as nice inside and not as fast, but that didn't stop around 70,000 motorists from signing the dotted line last year.

"They're doing very well. It's a good car. We know; it's our car," company boss Ralf Speth said during a recent interview with industry trade journal Automotive News.

Fighting Land Wind became even more difficult last year when the Chinese government canceled Land Rover's patent without warning. That's a big setback that opens the door to more clones and copies, especially since Evoques sold in China are built locally. However, Land Rover's legal team isn't ready to give up.

Photos by Ronan Glon.