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2018 nissan Rogue Sport

Nissan positioned the Rogue Sport as a smaller and more affordable alternative to the Rogue. You'll recognize it as the Qashqai if you've traveled to Canada or Europe.

Overview
The Rogue Sport is neither a Rogue nor is it particularly sporty. It is the non-American execution of a compact CUV, meaning it's a little bit smaller and a little bit more sophisticated than its American equivalent (the Rogue), while still being large enough to serve the same purpose overseas. Some may even go so far as to call it "right-sized."

To add context, the Rogue Sport is a little smaller in every dimension, giving up just over two inches of wheelbase, a foot of overall length, five inches of height and just a shade under half an inch of width to its bigger sibling.

Life aboard
Five passengers travel comfortably in the Rogue Sport's surprisingly roomy and ergonomic cabin. The materials are about what you'd expect in this segment; they're not great but they're not appalling, either. Even the standard cloth upholstery feels durable.

The Rogue Sport offers up to 22.9 cubic feet of trunk space with both rows of seats left up and a maximum of 61.1 cubes with the rear seats folded flat.

The analog instrument cluster is straight-forward: It's made up of a speedometer, a tachometer, a gas gauge and a temperature gauge. A configurable thin-film transistor (TFT) screen provides information such as the current speed limit, navigation directions (when equipped), which driving aids are turned on, and so forth.

Base models come with a five-inch touch screen in the center console. It's a relatively basic unit that offers little more than the essentials. Range-topping variants benefit from a seven-inch touch screen with navigation. It's a much more modern software that includes mobile apps and voice recognition technology.

Technical specifications
Power for the Rogue Sport comes with direct-injected 2.0-liter four-cylinder engine tuned to make 141 horsepower at 6,000 rpm and 147 pound-feet of torque at 4,400 rpm. It shifts through a continuously variable transmission (CVT).

Front-wheel drive comes standard and all-wheel drive is offered at an extra cost.

Front-wheel drive models return 25 mpg in the city, 32 mpg on the highway, and 28 mpg in a combined cycle. Selecting all-wheel drive lowers those figures to 24, 30, and 27, respectively.

Standard and optional equipment
Nissan offers the Rogue Sport in three trim levels named S, SV, and SL, respectively.

The base model comes with hill start assist, 16-inch steel wheels with hubcaps, power-adjustable mirrors, tinted windows, halogen headlights, daytime running lights, cloth upholstery, a six-way manually-adjustable driver's seat, a four-speaker stereo, Bluetooth connectivity, speed-sensitive volume control, and a multi-function steering wheel.

Depending on the trim level selected, the list of standalone options includes a heated steering wheel, 17-inch alloy wheels, heated door mirrors, a power moon roof, LED headlights, heated front seats, navigation, and driving aids such as a lane departure warning system and intelligent lane intervention.

Buyers can also add several option packages that bundle popular equipment.

Occupant safety
The Rogue sport comes with dual front, side, and curtain airbags in addition to traction and stability control systems. Automatic emergency braking and a blind spot monitoring system with rear cross traffic alert also come standard.

Buyers can order ProPilot Assist, Nissan's suite of semi-autonomous driving aids. It helps drivers stay in the middle of a lane, navigate stop-and-go traffic, and maintain a set vehicle speed and distance to the vehicle ahead. Think of it as cruise control on steroids.

Key competitors
The Nissan Rogue Sport's tweener status makes it a rival for a diverse selection of models including the Hyundai Kona, the Honda HR-V, the Toyota C-HR, the Jeep Renegade, and the Jeep Compass.